Advanced Acoustics Euphonic Studio Starter Kit - Small

£119.49 £128.94

SKU: SK-EUPH-S

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Advanced Acoustics Euphonic Studio Starter Kit - Small

 

What's In The Box?

Contained in the Small Euphonic Starter Kit are four 2ft Wedge Bass Traps and thirty two 12" Euphonic Acoustic Tiles.  The Wedge Bass Traps are 12" (305mm) by 12" (305mm) and are 2ft (610mm) long.  The Euphonic Acoustic Tiles are 12" (305mm) by 12" (305mm) covering a total area of 32sqft (2.97sqm).  The tiles are 55mm thick at the peak and have an NRC of 0.8.

Both the bass traps and the acoustic tiles are precision CNC cut to guarantee uniformity and a high level of accuracy.  These products are also available individually if you need an extra few bass traps or pack of tiles to complete you installation.  The colour of these bass traps and acoustic tiles is dark grey.

What Are The Benefits?

Our Advanced Acoustics Starter Kits are complete room packages designed to be a starting point for the treatment of a given space. The bigger the room, the more kits you'll need.  All the products are available individually so you can supplement the kit with an extra pack of tiles or a few extra Bass Traps if you need them.

The Euphonic range of sound deadening acoustic tiles is a popular choice for studio and home cinema installers.  The pre-mixed box of wedge profiled tiles and square tegular is a unique idea which offers a combination of ample foam thickness and increased surface area, the best of both worlds.

By installing small clusters of these acoustic treatment tiles in a random orientation around the room at first reflection points or other key areas you will increase acoustic clarity and remove unwanted distortion. These acoustic studio foam tiles work hard at controlling mid to high frequencies to help remove echo and control reverberation.

The wedge profile is the most instantly recognisable profile used in studio products so why not have a bass trap to match?  This classic cut profile is sharp and clean just like your recordings will be once these Bass Traps are installed. Bass Traps are vital for any studio design and should be one of the top priorities of studio design.

Once effective bass control has been installed standing waves are minimised and low end build up is brought under control.  Low end energy congregates in all corners of rooms so by placing effective bass traps in the corners you can reduce the detrimental effect this has. 

Care is taken in optimising size, profile, foam cell structure and foam density to present a product that offers high visual and acoustic value.  Durability is high on our list of priorities too, we manufacture a foam that won't crumble and turn to dust and won't change colour as soon as you've mounted them. 

Where Can I Use Them?

There are a wide range of applications for our acoustic products including:

  • High End Professional Studios
  • Home Studios
  • Rehearsal Rooms
  • Home Cinemas
  • Dedicated Listening Rooms
  • And more

How Much Acoustic Treatment Should I Use?

This is a very difficult subject to address. This is because every room is different. There are a lot of factors to take into consideration. As a generalization most rooms will need between 25% and 75% of coverage. This is only for the walls and ceiling. Most people forget when treating a room that the ceiling is just as important when it comes to treating a room as the walls are.

Here is a brief overview of suggested quantities of acoustic treatment:

 

  • Control Rooms for rock, pop, rap, hip-hop, R&B, country, techno, MIDI music, etc. usually benefit from 50% to 75% coverage and mostly absorption. Bass Trapping is also an important part of acoustic treatment for this type of room.
  • Control Rooms for jazz, art (classical), choral, acoustic, world and other forms of ensemble music usually benefit from 35% to 50% coverage.
  • Mixing rooms usually call for quite a dead area around the mixing desk itself from 50% to 85%. Around the rest of the room it needs a little absorption between 20% and 40% along with some diffusion.
  • “Live Rooms” will vary a lot. Some well-designed live rooms can get by with 20% coverage (or even less!). Most fall into the 25% to 50% range. The most successful Live Rooms usually have some degree of variability. This is done so that a studio is not limited to a certain number of styles of music. By making the room adjustable it gives the studio a high ability to accommodate different styles of music.
  • Isolation Booths usually call for quite a bit of absorption – 75% or more. If the booth is to be used for very tight vocal booth then near 100% absorption may be necessary.
  • Home theatres and dedicated listening rooms do require quite a large area of absorbing foam on the walls. This is mixed with some diffusion on the ceiling also.

Almost never will 100% absorption be needed and neither is it suggested. The room, no matter what it is going to be used for will still need some ‘liveliness’ in it. If 100% absorption is used the room will feel very close, tight and very very un-natural. The room could come to feel quite claustrophobic and extremely difficult to work in. By leaving a percentage of the area of the walls bare the exposed part can be reflective thus helping to stop your recordings or practise sessions from being overbearing. This will have the outcome of much better performances and recording results.